Oral Care Advice for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a holiday is time to catch up with family members, eat an excellent feast of foods and most importantly consider all you have to be grateful for in your life. However, this celebration is no time to slack on your dental care! Having to deal with oral care would really put a damper on the rest of the holiday season. To help you have a happy and healthy Thanksgiving, here are some tips for your thanksgiving long weekend that you can take into consideration.

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Shorten Your Meal Time. Perhaps the most negative aspect of a typical Thanksgiving meal is its length. Enjoying the company of friends and family for hours is an important part of the day, but try to avoid snacking or dragging the meal out too long. Continuing to expose your teeth to the acids in food makes it easier for cavity-causing bacteria to build up in your mouth. Instead of passing the time by munching, focus on sharing stories, watching movies, or playing games.

stay-hydrated
Stay Hydrated. It’s always a good idea to drink lots of water, but especially when you’re eating lots of rich, sweet foods, staying hydrated can help wash away debris and prevent plaque formation. In addition to providing a light rinse for your mouth between bites, drinking water helps improve your saliva flow, which further fights cavities. Water is also an excellent replacement for more damaging drink options like juice or soda.

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Brush and Floss. Probably something you’ve been told to do since you were little, so yes it is still important. You need to be especially diligent about dental hygiene on Thanksgiving. Even if you go to a friend or family member’s home for the holiday, don’t feel silly, make sure you bring a toothbrush and floss. It will come in handy. About thirty minutes after you’ve finished eating, quickly duck into the bathroom to brush and floss. If brushing your teeth at someone else’s house is something your not comfortable with, consider at least flossing.

cranberry-relishes
Ditch the sticky sides. Cranberry relishes are a dentist’s worst nightmare; they’re acidic, sweet, and stick to your teeth for hours to come, creating an ideal environment for bacteria to infect your gums and eat through your enamel. Other sticky offenders are pecan pie and mashed potatoes. If one of these is your favorite, just make sure you swish with water after eating and brush your teeth to wipe away the gummy remains.

Make a visit to the dentist after the holidays. We all know the holiday season can be bad for your weight, but the desserts and long meals are also tough on your teeth. If you’re concerned about caries or gum disease, this winter might be the perfect time to schedule a cleaning appointment One of our hygienists can scrub your teeth and Dr. Flanagan can check up on your mouth for any signs of disease. That way, you can prevent issues before they become more uncomfortable or costly. We can also perform cosmetic treatments to give you a brighter smile for holiday photos or celebrations.

At the end of it all, be thankful for your dental health. We have a lot to be thankful for, but having beautiful, healthy teeth is certainly something to be thankful for this holiday season.

Did you know that there are statistics on why people don’t visit the dentist? Nobody likes visiting the dentist, but it’s crucial that you do. As bad as this sounds it is true and the ADA (American Dental Association) has the facts for us. In 2014, around 22.9% of grown-ups demonstrated that they are either uncertain or certainly don’t plan to visit a dental practitioner in the following 12 months. In general, top reasons incorporate expense, having a sound mouth (i.e., not requiring dental care), and not having room schedule-wise to get to a dental practitioner. In particular, 40.2% of grown-ups showed that they will swear off dental consideration because of cost, 32.7% in light of the fact that they needn’t bother with dental consideration, and 14.1% in light of the fact that they don’t have room schedule-wise to get to a dental practitioner.

Be that as it may, when grown-ups are sorted by age, family unit pay, and medical coverage status, the main three purposes behind not wanting to visit a dental specialist change.